The Power of Poetry in the Psalms || Psalm 16

The Power of Poetry in the Psalms || Psalm 16

I have loved poetry for as long as I can remember. In Years 3 and 4, it was classics like Please Mrs. Butler (which I can still recite parts of) and The Highway Man that had my attention and love. In Year 6 I discovered Tyger by William Blake and fell in love the romantic poets, though it took me a decade to understand what romanticism truly meant (FYI way more philosophical then you’d think). During my GCSEs, I fell in love the words of Simon Armitage; reading Kid still brings me out in goosebumps and tingles from how the words feel on my tongue. There is something about poetry that captures the human experience in a way that nothing else does. The way it ripples when you read it out loud or recite it by heart. Even the best songs cannot have the same impact as poetry can.

When a Bleeding Woman Dared Touch the Messiah || Women, Periods, and Jesus

When a Bleeding Woman Dared Touch the Messiah || Women, Periods, and Jesus

Jesus healed a woman who was suffering from problems related to her menstrual cycle.

He didn’t skip over the fact that she is ill because of bleeding. Instead, Mick did something I never dreamed I would hear in any church. He used it as a chance to show that Jesus did not allow taboos, or even laws around what was unclean, to stop Him from doing good. He did not condemn the woman for touching Him before rushing off to make Himself clean. Instead, Jesus healed her of something that had, unfairly, separated her off from society.

You could accuse Mick of bowing to the demands of feminism and #menstrualrealism. Then again, I will confess to being all for menstrual realism and smashing that particular taboo. So it probably won’t come as much of a surprise that this part of Mick’s sermon really got to me. That he used it as an opportunity to challenge us over how we responded to women and girls struggling with menstrual-related problems was incredible.